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everywhere in this particular environment. because you have segments of high tech manufacturing. you have segments of innovative financial services. all of those types of businesses in this day and age need skilled productive talent. >> we don't know yet what's going to happen in the state of georgia, whether or not they will follow the lead of arizona and reject the pending legislation. but already we are seeing businesses like delta airlines and others try to distance themselves from what might happen in the state. how important is it for a company like delta to do that? >> well, delta's got a couple of different things at play here. there's lots of choice in airlines, right? and so they're in a very competitive business. they don't want to send the signal that they're aligned with the state, that is particularly unwelcoming or seems to be unwelcoming to certain individuals. and so that would be in the minds i'm sure of the management of delta. >> finally you've been crunching the numbers, doing the retch for a long time -- the research for a long time. more broadly speaking what might
the that the evidence we brought out in the environment of public works committee was new and hadn't been adequately considered. that was dr. o'connor's work showing the downstream harm from those near the mining of the tar sands and the testimony from a community organizer in texas about those who have health damage because of the refining of tar sands-type crude oil. and then those who are near the pepco, the waste product of it in detroit and chicago with really telling stories about children literally having to flee the baseball field to get away from the cloud of choking dust that was blown off the dump. >> mm-hmm. dr. o'connor, i keep hearing this, that the tar sands oil is far more toxic than anything else that the being refined anywhere in the world. is that correct, sir? >> absolutely. >> it is correct that there's nothing worse coming out of the ground on the face of the earth than this oil that's going to come out of the tar sands. >> all the information we have supports that. >> dr. o'connor, how toxic is it when it comes to imposing possible health risks on society? >> i guess from the
you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
is an attempt to deal with this country's global foot print to create new strategic environment where the u.s. is supposedly more likely to be dealing in surgical operations and not heavy ground invasions. since the former vice president chose to compare food stamps and the defense budget, let's go ahead and take a look at what's actually happening on that front, too. the recently enacted farm bill cut the food stamp program by $8 billion which means about 850,000 households will lose $90 in monthly benefits. we've reported on that. this year, after 47 million people saw their food stamp benefits reduced because of budget cuts, that's the context, and yet everyone's talking about the military cuts because secretary hagel's proposed pentagon budget makes for an easy headline. like this. "pentagon plans to shrink army to pre world war ii level." okay. here's what some of those cuts actually look like. this is the context behind these headlines. on the left there, see the military's current level. in the middle, the proposed level. on the right, 1940 levels. here are total numbers. so while it
is saying in an environment where some of the folks are honest, they want to make up revenue, you have to find it. we are cutting defense spending. we were talking about infrastructure, potholes, state funding. >> you have to make sacrifices. >> in the previous segment. the people who are serious want to pick up the amendment. if there's any room to maneuver or wiggle, i don't think the way they've approached the tax code gives me a lot of real faith. capital gains is an important area. by the way, to abby's point, you want to know a big idea, hold up or down votes on the floor. the speaker can put each one of these out. what i think happens here is similar to what happens on immigration. there's some piecemeal conversations but you can't actually get a vote on what i think are the most important parts. the capital gains thing, i'll end here, it's a problem because today's wealthy americans make more money through stock dividends than were before in history. >> right. >> our tax code has not caught up with that. you were alluding to that. if we don't deal with that, and i think deal wi
supply of hundreds of thousands of people. finally we must be mindful of the environment. first we operate in a time of severe budget constraints. as secretary of the department of homeland security, i therefore believe i am obligated to identify and eliminate inefficiencies, waste and unnecessary duplications of resources across the large and de-centralized bureaucracy, while pursuing important missions such as the recapitalization of the aging coast guard fleet. second, i am mindful of the surveys that reflect that morale is low. i intend to constantly remind our work force of the critical importance of their homeland security mission and that the department's greatest asset in pursuit of these mission is his our people. i will be a champion for the men and women of d.h.s., and i will advocate on their behalf. i look forward to working with this committee. the chairman is correct that i am actively working to fill the vacancies in senior management positions. i do that on a daily basis, and i look forward to a shared vision and a partnership with congress on our important mission
, radio shack had a tough time in that environment, 4.5%, cutting the management they don't need, and earnings per share beating profit on a ride so sales were still little tricky but stock is doing well. adam: the s and p is on track for record close and the dow is climbing back from earlier losses, 35 points, mixed economic news. turmoil in ukraine, testimony on the hill, an opportunity to address concerns regarding recent soft economic data. >> since my appearance before the house committee on number of data releases point to softer spending. part of that softness may reflect weather conditions. is difficult to discern how much. adam: joining us is oppenheimer funds chief economist, how much of a player is the weather in the south economic data? >> they asked me to come back in april or may and i will tell you. if you didn't buy a house you didn't buy a car because of a blizzard, you might buy it later on. you didn't go out to dinner, that is pretty much spending this law so it is hard to say i was looking at history of past times, got a fight after a particularly bad winters,
in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> and later on the, to the ice cometh. we'll take you where the flooding arrived. take a look at this. the flooding arrives in frozen form. a frozen river moving fast. we'll be right back. hey guys! sorry we're late. did you run into traffic? no, just had to stop by the house to grab a few things. you stopped by the house? uh-huh. yea. alright, whenever you get your stuff, run upstairs, get cleaned up for dinner. you leave the house in good shape? yea. yea, of course. ♪ [ sportscaster talking on tv ] last-second field go-- yea, sure ya did. [ male announcer ] introducing at&t digital life. personalized home security and automation. get professionally monitored security for just $29.99 a month. with limited availability in select markets. ♪ witmarge: you know, there's in a more enjoyable way to get your fiber. try phillips fiber good gummies. they're delicious, and a good source of fiber to help support regularity. wife: mmmm husband: these are good! marge: the tasty side of fiber. from phillips. save you fifteen percent or
really comfortable in her environment. she seemed to have built a really strong relationship with the three other females in her pod. >> then just days later, travino and her lawyer reached a plea bargain which spared her the death penalty. she was sentenced to 18 years in the arizona state prison system. >>> coming up -- >> i stabbed him in his lungs and his kidneys. and he basically drowned in his own blood. >> in prison for manslaughter, one inmate's past can come back to haunt him. >> before i was an inmate, you know, i was a correctional officer here at this facility. [ male announcer ] did you know that if you wear a partial, you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. with non-insulin victoza. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar, but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza. he said victoza works differently than pills, and comes in a pen. a
protest on an environment in a generation. >> we have thousands of young people here in the streets of washington, marching to the white house, to risk arrest, to demand obama said no to keystone xl. >> the most important issue that we're facing and it's going to affect millions of people all over the world. >> this is a march to show that young people care, care about our future, we're willing to come together and act, and now he needs to act. we are here together to show forth and president obama needs to make a pipeline. >> we need to show obama a lot of people who got him elected, youth vote, student vote, want him to take a stronger stance on climb and reject the pipe. >> we get arrested. first thing that this is not going to do anything. but as you go forth and you see people come to you and tell you you're a precedent you set, it has a huge impact. the most important thing pitting your body again the gears of the machine and say this madness must stop. >> what is profound about the sound bite we played the young lady said this is going to affect millions and millions of peopl
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to have him in this environment. >> our hearts go out to them for the unimaginable trauma that they've been through. >> it was expecting change prior to today. the time that the investigation continues, we've added a position to help them go through a process. >> uc berkeley's chance put out a statement saying sexual assault has no place on a college campus or anywhere in civilized society. >> in berkeley, i'm john sasaki, channel 2 news. >>> tonight, a 25$25,000 award is being offered over the case of the poisonous meatballs. last summer, a dog died in a similar incident. the ceo of yelp contributed most of that reward money. >>> the video is remarkable. an armed gunman thrown to the ground during a convenience store heist in the bay area. we tracked that man down and it tell you why he's being called a hero. >> and not the kind of video justin bieber wants to be featured in. a look at the moments just after his arrest last month in miami and what police say this showed. he had countless photos. >> plus the beauty pageant queen talks about life turned upside down by a cyber stalker
equipment does not hold up to the harsh environment, which can represent the challenge. as john henry smith, one man is trying to eliminate one part of the challenge. >> i was watching a heartbreaking news story about children in war zones and it explained the six left therapy to bring them back to humanity was just to play. simple, unstructured play. >> that was all the inspiration tim janeghan needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to communities, but he knew they didn't last long in the harsh playing field found in those communities. that's when he imagined a solution. >> to make a ball for the children that would not go flat. they could play and get the therapy. >> tim janeghan is a lyricist, who worked with a number of famous musicians, including siting. when he mentioned the idea to sting, he not only liked the idea, he offered to fund the research and design phase of developing the ball. >> let this be so successful that i can do for someone else what he did for me some day. it was, you know, i still get emotional when i think about it. >> 11 months, two tries lair,
. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that is a little bit more forgiving. gwen: launching a new effort to help young men and boys of color. covering the week pete williams of nbc news. ed o'keefe of "the washington post." and michael sheerer of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> it's one of the most amazing things we build and it doesn't even fly. we build classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators, we preserve habitats and serving america's veterans. every day thousands of boeing volunteers help their community be the best they can be, building something better for all of us. >> whether it's discovering an aspirin a day can prevent heart attacks worldwide or regenerating new heart muscles, our goal is to develop treatment. brigham and women's hospital. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- prudential. addition funding is
environment. that got off the ground. we are seeing wealthy investors turning it into something that can be more useful to invest in, as a way to create faster, more efficient transactions. >> i have to be honest with you. who would invest in bitcoin. why would they invest in bitcoin. i understand that price is low, currently. and the other problem was the price fluk twuted dramatically, right. >> four sure, and i would not recommend anyone invest in boit coin until there are regulations and until those are in place, and even then, there'll be a lot more mainstream more investment to come down the line before i recommend anyone get into this. >> how long do you think it will be before bitcoin gets back on track? >> i think it will be a couple of months. once we see regulations come online, superintendent lowsk. >> led the way, issuing licences. we'll see that, it will be a while before mainstream users will want to take a look. >> rob while, great to have you on the program. thanks for sharing your insight. >> from bitcoin to a different commodity. gold coins. a california couple walkin
's taking place and chaos a that they are trying to create an environment of ungovern apparently. as we see, things are dying out in terms of the momentum that these protests have. i think it's unfortunate that they don't respect the rules of democracy and some of the constitution as well. it allows for a recall referendum against any elected official. if they want him out. >> if it's so democratic, why do they kink out cnn and correspondents, report that more than 60 reporters in venzuela have been beaten and their material stolen from them and you have the president calling anybody who opponents they can oligarchs and fascists? >> he has employed that language. i wouldn't contest that because he has done so and he is calling on a class of people who have eroded the democracy and that ran the country into the ground and that, you know, today, those same people, not all of them. >> some would argue with the socialist government has run the government in the ground. >> that's not true. you cited figures for inflation but they were higher before. >> they weren't. >> actually not when chavez.
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
and greenpeace cofounder patrick moore. he made these comments before the senate environment and public works committee. he left greenpeace because he says that group became more interested in politics than the environment. what an announcement from him. >>> men who wait too long to become fathers could put their children at greater risk of developing mental health problems. that's according to a new study that followed more than 2.5 million men for 25 years. researchers found a child born to a 45-year-old father compared to a 24-year-old dad was three times more likely to have autism, 13 times more likely to have adhd, 25 times more likely to be bipolar and twice as likely to have schizophrenia. this is video you have to see to believe. two guys in those wing suits flying past christ the redeemer statue in britain. look at this. the two daredevils making that jump from about 6,500 feet. they landed safely. and what was the first thing they did? what do you think? what do you think? >> they prayed. >> drank a beer. look at that. >> they earned it. >> how close they get. nerve wracking. see yo
to incentives and health systems incentive changes, to less expensive environments that include clinics and home care. we're in the midst of a big transition overall. >> what is it that your company does exactly when you go in and try and streamline things? >> we're a performance improvement company that focuses on cost, in other words, how you procure all products. we have a $5 billion procurement business that helps hospitals buy what they buy, more importantly, how they use the products. there's a best practice out there but it's not used across the country. we take the process to what we know as best practices. >> you're trying to get people paid quicker, right? i mean, there's a million places to attack. are there too many -- what are your two or three primary ways of doing it? you can get bogged down being all things to all people. >> hospitals aline are over a trillion dollars vertically integrated in 5,000 locations, all very complex and all very different. we focus on cost reduction, clinical integration and payment and price integration so that what's being paid for the services render
environment today, even a small business has to spend $20,000 to $30,000 just complying with the 2800 regulations we layered on them federally let alone the state and local. you know, erin, i invest in small businesses every week. what's what i do. you should have these people talk to you. or even better still, let the president talk to somebody running a 17-person business in massachusetts or 30 employees in california. and hear what they say. they would not agree with him. and i think that is the core and the essence of america that we're not listening to. we need to listen to these people. they should tell us what to do. what they want right now is less government. >> thank you very much. i remember, by the way, the president saying he was going to go back and cut a whole lot of regulations. there was a big push for that. when you say 2800 on average, i'm going to assume you know your stats on that. that's horrific. that's probably something you could agree with the president on, too. still to come, a controversial bill some say is anti-gay in front of arizona's governor tonight. w
this plan by hager does not accurately reflect the security environment. roy blunt, it has the potential to harm america's readiness. we're not likely to see the knock-down, drag-out fight. remember the sequester was supposed to be the stick that would force republicans and some democrats to negotiate a grand bargain. but as we saw, many republicans looked over the edge of the cliff and said, you know what, sequester not so bad. in fact, some conservatives support the sequester, for imposing cuts that congress wouldn't have had the stomach to put in place otherwise, and for republicans, some conservatives who are putting fiscal responsibility near the top of their priority list, this may be a question of picking your poison. now, according to south carolina governor nikki haley, president obama delivered that message pretty bluntly when he spoke to republican governors at the chamber of commerce -- she was at the chamber of commerce, but this is what he said, according to her, when they met at the white house. >> the tone completely changed when we started talking about the national guar
experts say that's possible. but what if something in the environment is the culprit. state health officials have found nothing so far. you would think they would be working around the clock trying to find an answer talking to every single mom who's lost a baby. they're not and outrage is growing. here's senior correspondent elizabeth cohen. >> reporter: in the rural and fertile yakima valley, an alarming number of babies born with birth defects. anencephaly, babies born with much of their brain and skull missing. >> i was stunned. three in a couple month period of time. that's unheard of. they are such tragic, terrible outcomes. >> reporter: barron's shocking discovery prompted an investigation by the state health department, which showed that in three counties in a three-year period there were 23 cases of anencephaly, a rate four times the national average. what could be causing such a high rate here? is it just a coincidence or something more serious? this epidemiologist at the washington state health department conducted the investigation. >> did you find an answer? >> we have
's dedicated to minimizing its impact on the environment while teaching students about sustainability. >> the more we can create a model of, you know, this kind of living, you know, that ethic seeps into our culture at the school. >> reporter: they were installing programmable thermostats and replacing all the lights with cfls. in 2008 they installed a solar panel system of more than 2300 panels that offsets about 85% of the electrical bill. in the cafeteria, bins are labeled and every day the waste is taken for composting. >> we come down and we pour it in the bins and then we add water and manure and then some straw on top and we wait. >> we have kind of our sink dishwashing station. >> reporter: but the hub of the school sustainability program is its garden, an acre of land with garden beds, lemon trees an outdoor kitchen and chickens. >> it's nice to have all these things because we can really learn about how to keep the environment safe. >> reporter: by planting the food, they're learning about healthy eating. >> you planted the plant in the winter and then it grows in the spring
is he grew up in a more forgiving environment. and in hawaii, if you got in trouble, there weren't any real serious consequences, but on the streets of chicago, the consequences could be fatal. and he -- i was going to say, he feels this enormous responsibility to make sure that all of our children grow up and have the ability for that fair shot and opportunity to reach their dreams and so many children are being left behind right now. >> yeah, let's talk about it. he wants to bring a spotlight to this. >> yes, he does. >> how will this work? you talk about reaching out to corporations. what does that mean? explain the mechanics of the initiative. >> sure, let's go through that. already, we have ten foundations who are committed to putting up resources, in addition to the ones they've already put up, $150 million has already been spent, and they're prepared to invest an additional $200 million. and then we have a range of corporate leaders very engaged and interested in this issue. and what we'd like to do is let's look at the programs that work, like the "becoming a man" program in ch
in a different world. we wanted to create an environment that the guests don't want to move. it's been a long haul. really, how many awards show, how much rain, how much traffic? i really do want to create meaningful experiences. i really want to create an environment where those can gather to celebrate. >> reporter: there is plenty to see here and eat here thanks to wolfgang puck and his staff. i'm calling this party beauty and the feast.v, >> it's all of wolfgang's favorites and then some. they're sitting down and having like one dinner, eight ounces or 12 ounces of one thing, they'll have 40 different items. >> reporter: i tasted the mac and cheese with black truffle. now i know why truffles are so expensiv expensive. i took my oscar to go and on the subject of oscars -- >> here is the engraving station. this is exactly where the winners will be with one guest with a glass of champagne and having their oscar engraved. >> reporter: this ball takes place in a 28,000 square foot room, surrounded with some remarkable vertical garden. >> it has to be the next. it has to be the new idea, and the
come in here and you're really in a different world. we wanted to create an environment that the guests don't want to move. it's been a long haul. really, how many awards show, how much rain, how much traffic? i really do want to create meaningful experiences. i really want to create an environment where those can gather to celebrate. >> reporter: there is plenty to see here and eat here thanks to wolfgang puck and his staff. i'm calling this party beauty and the feast. >> it's all of wolfgang's favorites and then some. they're sitting down and having like one dinner, eight ounces or 12 ounces of one thing, they'll have 40 different items. >> reporter: i tasted the mac and cheese with black truffle. i took my oscar to go and on the subject of oscars -- >> here is the engraving station. this is exactly where the winners will be with one guest with a glass of champagne and having their oscar engraved. >> reporter: this ball takes place in a 28,000 square foot room, surrounded with some remarkable vertical garden. >> it has to be the next. it has to be the new idea, and the installation lo
this would cause harm to the state's reputation and into the business environment. >> reporter: it's already threatened ben bethel's clarendon hotel, despite his sign saying we serve everyone. he said gay customers inquiring about refunds and cancellations. >> that would result in about -- i'd say about 12,000 now, to $14,000 in lost revenue to the hotel. and that itself results in almost $2,000 in local and state sales tax revenues lost. >> reporter: but with the tide turning, even republicans who supported and voted for the bill, like state senator steve pierce -- you didn't think it was targeting the lgbt community? >> not at all, no. >> reporter: they're now urging brewer to veto it. >> we made a mistake, and now we have to fix it. >> reporter: if the governor doesn't sign or veto the bill by the end of the week it becomes law automatically. still, this morning an aide to the governor said this bill was never part of her agenda, another hint that a veto is likely. brian? >> mike taibbi starting us off from phoenix tonight. mike, thanks. >>> now to a new fight that's erupted in public tod
connell and the staunch opposition to obamacare. >> you know what in a sane environment people do when they have problems with a good objective? they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not -- if your pear is not in the white house and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening and if you cane stop it at least bad mouth it. and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work and get people torn up and mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> so according to the latest poll in kentucky, it's still anybody's race with grimes leading mcconnell. mcconnell's unpopularity may be leading the polls. mitch mcconnell seems anything but worried about the former president campaigning in his home state. he was asked about it yesterday on capitol hill. >> welcome him back. the last time he ran in 1996 he eked out a narrow victory in kentucky while i beat the current gov any by 160,000 votes, 10 points. in 2008 both bill and hilla
for both advertisers and the environment. more than 262 million pieces of direct mail are delivered by the u.s. postal service each day. and according to the epa, half of all advertising mail gets tossed in the trash. >> certainly marketers and fundraisers don't want to send a marketing offer fundraising offer to a consumer who doesn't want to receive that. >> reporter: the direct marketing association says consumers fed up with junk mail can opt out on the website dmachoice.org. the dma receives 10 to 15,000 requests each month and boone says opting out can make a big difference. >> at least an 80% reduction in marketing mail offers. you make sure that you line the mail up. >> reporter: but amy prefers paper karma a free app that helps you reduce junk. take a pictures. mail with the name and address and the app contacts the company for you. >> it will turn green and say it was a success. >> reporter: something that's finally beginning to give amy's shredder a rest. direct mail is big business. it brings in $16 billion a year for the u.s. postals service. amy says the app has helped
congress on hiv research and environment. and even elmo from sesame street asked lawmakers to support music programs in american schools. >> there are too many issues to expect people are going to focus on the range of important dates. >> if their celebrity can advance a cause, they're going to take advantage of the spotlight. abc news, washington. >> well parents of a 5-year-old boy in connecticut are demanding answers after his son was taken from school by the great grandfather of another student. the man told officials he didn't realize he had the wrong child until he got home he brought the boy back the family says they have no reason to believe the child was harmed but still, a lot of questions remain. >> he hasn't said a lot about it. very, very scared. the day of, once he got home. he's only five years old it's hard to extract information. >> well, the school immediately made changes to the pick up procedure but that is not nearly enough for the family. they're demanding a full investigation by police, including a background check of the man who took their child home. >> yikes coming
of the world sporting equipment does not hold up to the tough environment. one man is trying to eliminate part of the challenge. >> we were watching a news story about the flight of children in war zones and refugee champs. and the simplest most effective story was to play. simply and structured play. that was all the inspiration tim needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to third world communities. he knew they didn't last long in the playing fields found in those communities. that's when he imagined a solution. >> making a ball that would not go flat so they could just play. >> tim janeghan is a lir cyst, working with musicians, including siting, when tim janeghan mentioned the idea to sting, he not only liked the idea but offered to fund the research and design phase of developing the ball. >> pleas let this be so successful that i can do for someone else what he did for me. i still get emotional when i think about it. >> 11 months, two tries later it created nearly an indesproductable ball made from foam that doesn't need to be inflated. >> when did you know you had somet
more interested in politics than the environment. >> wind turbines could be damaged from hurricanes. they are showing the use of offshore wind turbines. in the case of a hurricane like katrina you need a farm more than twice the size for an impact. >>> nutrition labels will never be the same. we have a new look. >> if you are enjoying a bowl of cereal you are having more than a serving size listed on the box good companies started labelling documents fat was the focus. now they are more concerned about how many calories we consume. they will show them in larger boulder font. who really eats oent half a cup of cereal? you will be warned there are added sugars and even have nutritional advice with instructions to avoid too much or get enough of this. while the design of the new labels have not cbeen confirmed they are several years away they are around 2 billion doll laterals. >> live from the business channel for us. >>> time 46 after the hour. there's a brand new bieber video out. but it has nothing to do with his music. why it could get him into more trouble. >> turns out that gold
that are more adapted to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. >> large dust cloud -- >> reporter: in december 1977, california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the topsoil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, top tom delay utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock, tolled utility towers. it spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento. >> that topsoil came here and dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that topsoil, valley fever spores. dr. flynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred case of cocci here in sacramento from that dust storm. >> it killed 6. and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lauer -- >> something in the air. >> reporter: all it takes is a gust of wind. sharon chin, kpix 5. >> a few cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area in the 1970s. the symptoms are pretty common, similar to a cold or flu. sometimes they include a rash. >>> bye-bye barge. the mysterious google barge is leavin
everybody else. and this makes for a very toxic environment. i think for everybody going into november. bill: you agree. >> absolutely agreeing. in fact that is one of the reasons why the obama administration are positioning themselves on the side of the people for fairness, for redistribution against the republican party, bill, that has no narrative. that has no arguement. that just says no. bill: back on this poll, quickly. 25% of the democrats expressed that disappointment. >> i think they should. bill: are they disappointed in him and his policies or think he is not liberal enough. >> some say he is not liberal enough. others say they are disappointed in his policies or result of his policies. the fact that there is gridlock and no progress. bill: thanks to both of you. >> thank you. bill: 40% of independents are not happy. >> right. bill: that is really -- >> harbinger of ill for the administration. bill: thank you, doug. thank you, monica. what's next, martha? martha: coming up the poet giving a kiss to a little admirer. why the pontiff's mini-me caused quite a sensation in st. peter's
. and the second problem has been the environment for safety of media workers is not that, still not good. there's still a lot of intimidation going on, particularly when cases become personal. and then those who are covered will go after the media workers and start -- [inaudible] we have had examples of in this the past. and the thursday -- the third problem has been lack of sufficient education in the area of investigative journalism among afghan media workers which is a pity because in afghanistan which corruption makes a huge problem, there's a huge need for investigative journalism. >> you know, that segways to another subject. let me ask you about this, james, and it's sort of our business in a way and also the business of mr. anzar here which is state broadcasting, you know, government broadcasting. mr. anzar's rta is moving to more of a public broadcasting model and changing the way they think about their work. i guess the question for you and i and maybe others in the room here, what's the appropriate role for the bbc and voa and other international broadcasters that also broadcast into
workers and especially in this high-growth environment, where are you going to get people to work to clean our hotel rooms or do our landscaping? and we don't need to put these employers in a position of hiring undocumented and illegal workers. >> sink is running in a special election for the seat of the late bill young. her campaign says that clip misrepresents the candidate's position on immigration. we'll have a full report on that race tomorrow. >>> so is president obama bailing on afghanistan at the cost of national security? what is the policy? we'll ask the fox all-stars in just a minute. test test. test test. the day we rescued riley was a truly amazing day. he was a matted mess in a small cage. so that was our first task, was getting him to wellness. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers, you can find it all on angie's list. we found riley at the shelter, and found everything he needed at angie's list. join today at angieslist.com like carpools... polly wants t
're buying them, more efficient, less emission into the environment. it makes a lot of sense. >> the repeal takes effect july 1st. any who's already paid will get a refund. >>> more businesses and major sports league speaking out against a controversial bill in arizona. wendy has an update. >> this list keeps on growing. banks, airlines, sports leagues, voicing their opposition to this anti-gay law. moments ago, major league baseball was the latest to reiterate it has a no tolerance policy towards discrimination joins jpmorgan chase, southwest and american airlines and southwestern bell saying they apologize this measure. today, the national hispanic bar association said it would cancel its upcoming convention in phoenix in 2015 or next year's convention if this measure passes. the measure would allow businesses to refuse to serve gays and lesbians on the basis of religious beliefs. governor jan brewer has until saturday to either sign or veto this measure. back to you. >> thanks, wendy. >>> tonight the daughter of a falls church woman killed in a dead deadly bus accident wants the public t
to selected researchers and human rights activists in 100 countries. media independence, the environment in which reporters work and transparency, to affect news gathering. this year fin hand, the netherlands and norway lead the list. but the u.s., regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46, one rung above haiti. sandy baron questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the general respect for rule of law in this country. the general respect for free press. >> a lot of people looks at the united states as a model. there need to be some improvements regarding the way the journalists and their associates are able to do their jobs. >> well, in fact some investigative journalists are saying that news gathering is becoming more difficult, especially when it comes to reporting national security issues. tony. >> randall pinkston, thank you. >>> antigay policies in russia is one of the issues, rosalind jordan, before i hack up a lung here. >> people who were protesting against their govern
. the next in line were documentaries about the environment. and next after that, immigration. so we are going to tell you about the grand prize winners this year. it was a team. their topic was called earth first, phrack executive. it was a three-person team from long beach polytechnic high school in california. they were served by communication a three team members in that group, emma larson, michaela caps and sir haida check will be talking with one of the three members of the team right now. hi, emma. >> guest: hello. >> host: what was your response when you won grand prize? >> guest: we were shocked. we let that one another and we could not believe it. posta when you finish, to journey sense of how good it was? >> guest: we did not. >> guest: tommy how you got interested in the first place. tesco well, our ninth grade project is required for students to complete. >> host: how did your team come together? did the teacher assign them? >> guest: yes, we could pick our team members. we chose other people we have known for a few years. we were comfortable and that we worked well toge
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